Accent ( noun , verb )

(As a noun)

Accent ( noun )

  1. A distinctive way of pronouncing a language, especially one associated with a particular country or group.
  2. A stress or emphasis placed on a particular syllable or word in speech.

Origin:

From middle english accent, borrowed from latin accentus ("tone, accent"), from ad ("to") + cantus ("song").

Examples:

  1. She spoke with a strong French accent.
  2. He had a slight accent, but it was difficult to place where he was from.
  3. The word "herb" is usually accentuated on the first syllable.
  4. He was trying to lose his accent in order to sound more American.
  5. The accent of the region is unique and it is different from any other accent.

(As a verb)

Accent ( verb )

  1. A distinctive way of pronouncing a language, especially one associated with a particular country or group.
  2. A stress or emphasis placed on a particular syllable or word in speech.

Origin:

From middle english accent, borrowed from latin accentus ("tone, accent"), from ad ("to") + cantus ("song").

Examples:

  1. She spoke with a strong French accent.
  2. He had a slight accent, but it was difficult to place where he was from.
  3. The word "herb" is usually accentuated on the first syllable.
  4. He was trying to lose his accent in order to sound more American.
  5. The accent of the region is unique and it is different from any other accent.
Some random words: hogtie, cob, shareholding