Acquittal ( noun , verb )

(As a noun)

Acquittal ( noun )

A judgement or verdict that a person is not guilty of the crime with which they have been charged.

Origin:

Middle english, from old french acquit, from latin acquitare to acquit, from ad- + quitare to make free, from quittus, past participle of quitare to release, discharge; akin to old high german frewen to free, latin quietus quiet.

Examples:

  1. The jury reached a verdict of acquittal in the murder trial.
  2. The accused was granted an acquittal on the grounds of self-defense.
  3. The judge ordered an acquittal due to lack of evidence.
  4. The defense attorney argued for an acquittal on the basis of reasonable doubt.
  5. The high-profile acquittal of the celebrity on charges of tax evasion made headlines.

(As a verb)

Acquittal ( verb )

A judgement or verdict that a person is not guilty of the crime with which they have been charged.

Origin:

Middle english, from old french acquit, from latin acquitare to acquit, from ad- + quitare to make free, from quittus, past participle of quitare to release, discharge; akin to old high german frewen to free, latin quietus quiet.

Examples:

  1. The jury reached a verdict of acquittal in the murder trial.
  2. The accused was granted an acquittal on the grounds of self-defense.
  3. The judge ordered an acquittal due to lack of evidence.
  4. The defense attorney argued for an acquittal on the basis of reasonable doubt.
  5. The high-profile acquittal of the celebrity on charges of tax evasion made headlines.
Some random words: suppose, roofer, turret