Alibi ( noun , verb )

(As a noun)

Alibi ( noun )

  1. An excuse or plea offered by a person accused of a crime to prove that they were elsewhere at the time the crime was committed.
  2. An explanation offered to account for one's presence or actions at a particular time or place.

Origin:

Mid 17th century: from latin alibi "elsewhere", from alius "other" + ibi "there".

Examples:

  1. He provided an alibi that he was at work when the crime was committed.
  2. She had an alibi that she was at home with her family.
  3. He had a solid alibi that he couldn't have committed the crime.
  4. She had an alibi that she was with her friend at the time of the incident.
  5. He had an alibi that he was out of town during the robbery.

(As a verb)

Alibi ( verb )

  1. An excuse or plea offered by a person accused of a crime to prove that they were elsewhere at the time the crime was committed.
  2. An explanation offered to account for one's presence or actions at a particular time or place.

Origin:

Mid 17th century: from latin alibi "elsewhere", from alius "other" + ibi "there".

Examples:

  1. He provided an alibi that he was at work when the crime was committed.
  2. She had an alibi that she was at home with her family.
  3. He had a solid alibi that he couldn't have committed the crime.
  4. She had an alibi that she was with her friend at the time of the incident.
  5. He had an alibi that he was out of town during the robbery.
Some random words: homiletic, reactive, mismanage