Alliterative ( adjective , noun )

(As an adjective)

Alliterative ( adjective )

Having the repetition of the same sound at the beginning of words or syllables.

Origin:

From latin alliterativus, from alliterare ("to begin with the same letter"), from ad- ("to") + littera ("letter"), meaning "having the repetition of the same sound at the beginning of words or syllables".

Examples:

  1. The alliterative phrase "Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers" is a tongue twister.
  2. The poem had a strong alliterative pattern.
  3. The alliterative sound of the "s" in "She sells sea shells" is catchy.
  4. He used alliterative words to create a rhyme scheme.
  5. The alliterative effect of the "f" sound in "Fuzzy Fuzz Face" adds emphasis.

(As a noun)

Alliterative ( noun )

Having the repetition of the same sound at the beginning of words or syllables.

Origin:

From latin alliterativus, from alliterare ("to begin with the same letter"), from ad- ("to") + littera ("letter"), meaning "having the repetition of the same sound at the beginning of words or syllables".

Examples:

  1. The alliterative phrase "Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers" is a tongue twister.
  2. The poem had a strong alliterative pattern.
  3. The alliterative sound of the "s" in "She sells sea shells" is catchy.
  4. He used alliterative words to create a rhyme scheme.
  5. The alliterative effect of the "f" sound in "Fuzzy Fuzz Face" adds emphasis.
Some random words: hookup, invigorate, jerk