And ( conjunction , preposition , adverb , noun )

(As a conjunction)

And ( conjunction )

  1. Used to connect words of the same part of speech, clauses, or sentences, that are to be taken jointly.
  2. Used to connect words, phrases, and clauses, indicating that the elements so connected are to be taken together in a single complex whole.

Origin:

Old english and, ond, of germanic origin; related to dutch en and german und.

Examples:

  1. I had toast and coffee for breakfast.
  2. She took her umbrella and coat.
  3. He read the book and went to sleep.
  4. I'll have the chicken and rice please.
  5. He was tired but he kept going and going.

(As a preposition)

And ( preposition )

  1. Used to connect words of the same part of speech, clauses, or sentences, that are to be taken jointly.
  2. Used to connect words, phrases, and clauses, indicating that the elements so connected are to be taken together in a single complex whole.

Origin:

Old english and, ond, of germanic origin; related to dutch en and german und.

Examples:

  1. I had toast and coffee for breakfast.
  2. She took her umbrella and coat.
  3. He read the book and went to sleep.
  4. I'll have the chicken and rice please.
  5. He was tired but he kept going and going.

(As an adverb)

And ( adverb )

  1. Used to connect words of the same part of speech, clauses, or sentences, that are to be taken jointly.
  2. Used to connect words, phrases, and clauses, indicating that the elements so connected are to be taken together in a single complex whole.

Origin:

Old english and, ond, of germanic origin; related to dutch en and german und.

Examples:

  1. I had toast and coffee for breakfast.
  2. She took her umbrella and coat.
  3. He read the book and went to sleep.
  4. I'll have the chicken and rice please.
  5. He was tired but he kept going and going.

(As a noun)

And ( noun )

  1. Used to connect words of the same part of speech, clauses, or sentences, that are to be taken jointly.
  2. Used to connect words, phrases, and clauses, indicating that the elements so connected are to be taken together in a single complex whole.

Origin:

Old english and, ond, of germanic origin; related to dutch en and german und.

Examples:

  1. I had toast and coffee for breakfast.
  2. She took her umbrella and coat.
  3. He read the book and went to sleep.
  4. I'll have the chicken and rice please.
  5. He was tired but he kept going and going.
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