Conceit ( noun , verb )

(As a noun)

Conceit ( noun )

  1. An excessively high opinion of oneself.
  2. A fanciful or elaborate metaphor or simile in literature.

Origin:

Middle english, from anglo-french, from latin conceptus, from concipere to take in, conceive, from com- + capere to take — more at heave.

Examples:

  1. He had a conceit that he was the smartest person in the room.
  2. Her conceit about her beauty was unwarranted.
  3. His conceit was his downfall.
  4. The poet's use of a conceit in the poem is clever.
  5. The conceit of the novel is that the characters are animals.

(As a verb)

Conceit ( verb )

  1. An excessively high opinion of oneself.
  2. A fanciful or elaborate metaphor or simile in literature.

Origin:

Middle english, from anglo-french, from latin conceptus, from concipere to take in, conceive, from com- + capere to take — more at heave.

Examples:

  1. He had a conceit that he was the smartest person in the room.
  2. Her conceit about her beauty was unwarranted.
  3. His conceit was his downfall.
  4. The poet's use of a conceit in the poem is clever.
  5. The conceit of the novel is that the characters are animals.
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